Changes

Jump to navigation Jump to search
Updating to match new version of source page
Line 17: Line 17:  
Along with the list of free GNU/Linux distributions, the FSF maintains a list of GNU/Linux distributions that have been rejected a free status for one reason or another<ref>https://gnu.org/distros/common-distros.html</ref>. For each distribution in this list, there is a comment with a brief argument for refusal. From the comment on Debian, it becomes clear that the main source of disagreement between the FSF and the Debian Project in the interpretation of the phrase "free distribution" is a document known as the Debian Social Contract.
 
Along with the list of free GNU/Linux distributions, the FSF maintains a list of GNU/Linux distributions that have been rejected a free status for one reason or another<ref>https://gnu.org/distros/common-distros.html</ref>. For each distribution in this list, there is a comment with a brief argument for refusal. From the comment on Debian, it becomes clear that the main source of disagreement between the FSF and the Debian Project in the interpretation of the phrase "free distribution" is a document known as the Debian Social Contract.
   −
The first version of the Social Contract was published on July 4, 1997, by the second Debian Project Leader, Bruce Perens. As part of this contract, a set of rules called the [https://debian.org/social_contract#guidelines Debian Free Software Guidelines] (DFSG) was also published. Since then, to become part of Debian, the license under which the software is distributed must meet the DFSG. The Social Contract documented the intention of the Debian developers to build an operating system only from free software, and the DFSG helped classify software into free and non-free. On April 26, 2004, a new version of the document was approved, which replaced the 1997 version.
+
The first version of the Social Contract was published on July 4, 1997<ref>https://lists.debian.org/debian-announce/1997/msg00017.html</ref>, by the second Debian Project Leader, Bruce Perens. As part of this contract, a set of rules called the Debian Free Software Guidelines (DFSG) was also published. Since then, to become part of Debian, the license under which the software is distributed must meet the DFSG. The Social Contract documented the intention of the Debian developers to build an operating system only from free software, and the DFSG helped classify software into free and non-free. On April 26, 2004, a new version of the document was approved, which replaced the 1997 version.
   −
The Debian Social Contract has five points. To answer the main question, we need only two of them – the first and the fifth, so they will be given below, and the others are omitted. Check out the full version of the contract [https://debian.org/social_contract#guidelines here].
+
The Debian Social Contract has five points. To answer the main question, we need only two of them – the first and the fifth, so they will be given below, and the others are omitted. Check out the full version of the contract [https://debian.org/social_contract here].
    
The first point says: «'''Debian will remain 100% free'''. We provide the guidelines that we use to determine if a work is "free" in the document entitled "The Debian Free Software Guidelines". We promise that the Debian system and all its components will be free according to these guidelines. We will support people who create or use both free and non-free works on Debian. We will never make the system require the use of a non-free component.»
 
The first point says: «'''Debian will remain 100% free'''. We provide the guidelines that we use to determine if a work is "free" in the document entitled "The Debian Free Software Guidelines". We promise that the Debian system and all its components will be free according to these guidelines. We will support people who create or use both free and non-free works on Debian. We will never make the system require the use of a non-free component.»
959

edits

Navigation menu